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Askew Review 15

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AMERICAN STATIC
- Soundtrack of the Struggle (Street Anthem Records) Imagine you’re at the beach and you see a young beauty bounce by with a couple stray hairs creeping out of her bikini.  You’d probably register that.  Now imagine if instead it was a large, unruly clitoris popping out at you.  I think you’d definitely take notice.  American Static is that remarkable clit. (I know- it’s time for me to stop being such a fuckin’ sicko and get on with the goddamn review, so I will).  I threw this disc into my CD player with 3 others I’d never heard and put it on random shuffle, intending to have some background music while I did a bunch of crap around the house.  The first song to fly out at me was “Handout,” track 11 of Soundtrack of the Struggle.  Its tough, melodic, working-fucking-class roar made me stop what I was doing, turn the shuffle off and start giving these guys a serious listen.  I instantly got that cool feeling I had when I first heard Mung.  In fact, at their best, American Static reminds me in different ways of both Mung and the Dropkick Murphys.  So when I read their press sheet, it shocked the shit out of me that these guys aren’t from Boston at all, instead hailing from Riverside, Cal-ee-for-nye-yay.  No matter- they’ve got a great knack for writing salt of the earth, strong, goddamn fist-pumpin’ anthems.  Tracks like, “Youth,” “Freedom,” “Poor and the Proud,” and “This is Our Lot” make you just want to punch some fucker in his freakin’ rich prick gob, and these songs make you smile like a bastard to boot.  Now put your big clit back in your bathing suit and go check this out already. –Ben Hunter

 

 

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