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Askew Review 15

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ABSINTHE ROSE – Black Earth (absintherose.org and rodentpopsicle.com) Absinthe Rose’s Black Earth is a joy to cover because the music is tight in a damn fine cohesive jamboree fyck ya (!) fashion. Read this muddahs, I absolutely dig this release. So much so, I will see this band live as they are currently out of Boston, MA…and I have fallen in love with founder/singer/guitarist/banjoist Kimbo Rose. She has grabbed me by my throat, heart, and soul. And ear drums, too, of course. This DIY eleven song LP (1000 pressed in various colors) sounds like Absinthe Rose would fit in at The Newport Folk Festival and yer local punk dump and a fancy jazz joint (though, it would have to be a rowdy fancy jazz joint) and even in a prohibition era speakeasy! In all this is also a hillbilly banjo and thumping rock-a-billy upright bass that simply drives me mad (I want to play this instrument, badly). Kimbo Rose’s voice is unique, but makes me think of an American sounding PJ Harvey with her low/high notes and tendency to project it where you do not expect. It’s an addictive singing voice. The tempo of the music is catchy and intense…even the numbers that start off slow pick up somewhere along the line. I reviewed the LP (also available on cd and downloads) and what a magnificent piece of art work this gatefold album is! White on black with lyrics-of which there are many- and artwork by JXRXKX. I love all the songs, but “Roots of Anarcho” and “Stories of Our Youth” really perked my nipples. It’s been a long time since I’ve had my head blown off by an unsolicited submission…it must be somewhere over Cape Cod by now. –denis sheehan
 

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