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Askew Review 15

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THE SEEKERS-
(Sub Rosa) 2003. Horror. 77 minutes. Not rated. Nudity, violence, sexual situations. Chronicles the effects a videotape has on its viewers. Scott, the main character, learns the significance of the tape and experiences some nasty surprises along the way, but fights back with the help of Chris, another victim of the tape. The secrets unfold as Scott, and the audience, view two separate vignettes. The evil force behind the tape, Tota Levil, reveals herself to be a more complex adversary then either Scott or Chris anticipated. A plot twist enlivens the latter minutes of the movie.       
This movie makes no pretense to be other than it is, a bargain basement horror film (grade D). Although the movie’s advertising touts its similarities to the Ring, the focus on evil in the VCR is the only connecting factor. That being said, a viewing of The Seekers lingers in the memory long after other schlock horror flicks fade. The actors, aside from the lovely Felicia Pandolfini, offer interesting examples of unorthodox shapes, sizes, and faces. I was almost empowered to see unconventional beauties parading in gleeful nudity. A hilarious moment early in the film occurs when one actress seems totally comfortable in only a pair of panties, yet fumbles over the cursing in her dialogue as if she had never said anything worse than "darn" in her life. I did begin to enjoy the latter half of this film, and was surprised by a few plot points. Extras include; commentary track, bloopers, behind-the-scenes featurette, trailers, etc. The Seekers is worth seeing once, but bring patience and a sense of humor. - Debby Regan.

 

 

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