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SUSPENDED ANIMATION
(First Run Features) 2001. Drama/thriller. 114 minutes. Not rated. Violence, brief nudity. While on a snowmobile vacation to clear his head, animator Thomas Kempton suddenly finds himself drugged, duct taped to a wheelchair, and prepped to be consumed by two cannibal sisters. Luckily for Tom, his buddies arrive and save him with seconds to spare. Returning home, Tom finds himself obsessed with his ordeal and becomes fixated with discovering more about the two psychopathic sisters. One thing leads to another, and poor olí Tom finds himself in psychopath hell, once again.
           
Looking for a movie thatíll keep you watching for 114 minutes? Look no further than Suspended Animation. This baby has it all: suspense, little horror, thrilling action, fights, blood, and a little sadness (sensitive slob, I am). Worse part about this movie is that itís believable! I can really see this crap happening. The all around acting is great, but Fred Meyers (plays Sandor, a troubled teenager) is truly one frightening dude. Meyers is able to pull off Sandorís feminine traits, while still being an absolute scary bastard. Nicely directed by John Hancock, who also directed the 1971 release,
Let's Scare Jessica to Death. Although I do not remember Hancockís 1971 effort, I do remember being scared to death while watching it as a youngster. Thirty years later, Hancock has engrossed me yet again. At times, Suspended Animation does parallel other movies (figure them out for yourself, lazy bones) plot wise, but does remain entertaining enough to keep you watching and waiting.  DVD extras include; a behind the scenes featurette, photo gallery, etc. If I were to ever come face to face with Fred Meyers, I would have to run; very fast and very far. Ė Denis Sheehan

 

 

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