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SAVAGE HARVEST
(Wicked Pixel) Independent Horror. 72 Minutes. Color. Not Rated. Long ago, an elder leader of a Cherokee tribe brought forth evil spirits that wiped out his people. Those spirits have stayed dormant since then, imprisoned in the rocks that covered the elderís grave. Now the unknowing descendant of the tribeís medicine man has awakened those spirits. These evil phantoms have the ability to possess living beings, and threaten to overtake and destroy a group of friends, unless they can discover the spiritís weaknesses and defeat them.
  
Savage Harvest was produced in 1993, and shows some of the limitations of shot-on-video movies made during that period. Some of the night scenes (there are many of them) look a little on the grainy side, and even at only 72 minutes, a little tightening of the final product, editing-wise might have helped the story move along a little better. To me those are minor issues, however. Writer/Director Eric Stanze is one of the more accomplished SOV indie directors working today, and Savage Harvest reveals his growing potential as a filmmaker. Sure, there is a more than passing resemblance to earlier horror films, such as the original Evil Dead, but there are many inventive touches as well. In particular I was impressed by the makeup work by Tony Bridges, which rivals in some instances the examples you see in current releases in the horror genre. On the technical side, the movie sounds great, and there is some creative use of the camera. The acting also is above average, for this kind of production. In the very scattershot world of SOV horror, Eric Stanze is a talent that continues to evolve and improve. I suggest you pick up Savage Harvest and check out other Wicked Pixel releases. And no, they didnít pay me to say that! - Budd Layman

 

 

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