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ED GALING
- Five separately sold books. (Propaganda Press) Diner, Rooftops, Sweet & Sour (Life Poems), The Next Voice You Hear, Scribbles.
   Ok, I do not typically cover books of poetry because I generally do not like poetry (even though I attempt to write it). However, I read some of Ed Galing’s stuff (we are published in the same lit mag-oh ya) and felt the need to read more (that would be the five books listed above). Mr. Galing, who is in his early 90s, writes poetry as he sees it. He doesn’t use metaphors or try to camouflage his thoughts or feelings using a thesaurus or nature. Instead of describing a homeless person begging for food on the street as “a wilted wind blown flower on the prosperous hillside of capitalism,” Ed writes, “…there is nothing/poetic about/going hungry/begging for handouts.” See what I mean? Mr. Galing writes about stuff we all can understand and relate (though a few of the poems concerning being Jewish were lost on me because I am not Jewish and I’ve me no idea what a Torah is). Though, the man has seen and lived twice over whatever it is you and I have seen in our lives. He doesn’t waste words concerning fire hydrants and street signs. Mr. Galing instead writes about packing up his deceased wife’s, of 60 years, clothes for Goodwill into plastic bags while recalling where she wore that red dress, that white dress, those shoes, and that hat. Fuck the 21 year old “poet” and his and her poetry about life’s transgressions. The man’s thoughts and experiences are compelling, and I can honestly write that Ed Galing is the first poet to truly capture me and leave me wanting more. Scribbles is a tiny “pocket protector” book (it’s held together by one staple). The remaining four are half-page sized saddle stapled. Check out  link up there for page count, prices, etc. I now feel like an ass for writing poems about 69’ing and a telephone pole. – Denis Sheehan

Note: since writing the above review a few months ago, I've had the pleasure of reading several other Galing books and to put it simply, you can't miss. I even brought up Mr. Galing and one of his poems in Track Wreckard X!

 

 

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